W10, #3: THE WRITTEN WORD

Who: All periods

Set-up: While we spend a great deal of time on the ‘techniques’ of writing, we must never forget that writing is as much an ‘attitude about life’ as it is a set of skills.

Challenge: Pick one of these quotations about writing that catches your eye.  Offer a reaction.

Length: 7+ sentences:

Option 1:

“It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop.” — Vita Sackville-West

Option 2:

“The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov

Option 3:

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

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43 responses to “W10, #3: THE WRITTEN WORD

  1. “It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop.” — Vita Sackville-West

    Um…wow this is exactly how I feel about writing. As of now I truly don’t find that much value in my life. That is why I want to write so that I can prove my worth; have concrete evidence that the years I spent on this earth were not in vain. As in the quote I feel like a day without writing is a day wasted. With my experience in writing fiction I also agree completely that you can never feel the same way twice. (Ha! If I am tired and writing, my characters are suddenly complaining that they really want to go to bed!) It would be very difficult to redo a sculpture exactly how you have previously done it, as it is to reform a scene or paragraph that you imagined but did not write at that moment. This shows how much emotions and physical states control the human mind. Also it is what makes writing so valuable and memorable; when a writer can combine what they are feeling and make their work a creation of humans for humans.

    ***

    Mr. Long: Intriguing how the line about “prove my worth” changes the way the beginning of that line reads. Powerful response overall.

  2. I think the First quote is true because it speaks about how the human mind tries to retain words of the day but we are unable to because we can’t comprehend the intracacies unless we are in the moment. If humans are to be able to remember the little things that happened the day before the next day then they have to write them down. I know that I can’t remember the things that I did last week. Mostly my life has been one big blur since the beginning of the year. If I start writing about thing then maybe they would stay in my head better.

    ***

    Mr. Long: Like the line re: the loss of the details when we lose the moment. “Big blur” moments definitely dog all of our lives at various times.

  3. I strongly agree with the first quote. It’s why I write in a journal every night. There’s no way someone can remember every event that affects him/her, every funny thing that happens, or every feeling that he/she feels, every day of his/her life. And I like to remember them. They’re a part of my life, and years from now I’ll read those things I wrote and learn even more from them than what I did while I was writing them.

    All the same, there are times when I feel like, “Ugh, I don’t want to write; I just want to go to bed…” Yet when I write, the days do seem less like they “slip emptily by.” Writing allows me to see something special about each day as it passes, and it gives me a good ten to fifteen minutes of reflection that I wouldn’t normally find in a normal, hectic day.

    ***

    Mr. Long: Fully empathize with the idea that some nights/days are just impossible in terms of finding time/energy to write, and yet appreciating the fleeting moments will never come around again. I think some people are bold when it comes to the ‘tired’ days and others are skewed by needing ‘energy’. I am in the later group.

  4. “It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop.” — Vita Sackville-West

    I totally agree with this quote. In a way an author is like a photographer. When you read their work you get a look at what their world was like and the culture and tone of the period. Like how the dark moods in Lord of the flies are a reflection on humanity brought on by WWII. And I understand the random compulsion that you’ll get to write and when you can’t you just lose all your inspiration, forget your idea, or the magic of the moment is lost. Also what’s a better way to capture a moment than to write it down for you and numbers of people to experience later? The author doesn’t want anything to pass by unnoticed and they pick what they find most interesting and then write about it. What other reason to write is there besides capturing and expressing something important and special, to preserve it for all time. At the same time though there are some things that should not be captured or limited by being written down, but left free to evolve and influence each person in its own way. It is only the amazing writers who can express these inexpressible things with out imprisoning them. It is that ability that sets them apart from the rest.

    ***

    Mr. Long: Finding myself very intrigued by the conflict between holding onto memories (through writing) and letting other moments evolve and take shape without the written form. Playing off your photographer idea, I find that’s very true with a young child at home. I want — as his papa — to capture everything, but then again that means I’m ‘behind the lens’ and not ‘in’ the moment with him. Same as a writer. Some people can’t experience life without thinking of it in real-time as a writer, while others just ‘live’ the moment. A curious thing our brains!

  5. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, writtten in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.”

    This quote explains my problem when it comes to writing almost exactly. I am always full of ideas to write about and just when i finally put something on the screen, I have already moved on to the next idea. My mind seems to wander when I want it to be focused on my assignment. I wonder if my mind will ever be trained to focus on one idea, and if it does will I want to let it go back to the old ways of wondering? I think it’s necessary to focus on one idea if you are trying to write something but not in everyday life. Your mind has to wonder and think of all of the different degrees and possibilities.

    ***

    Mr. Long: I was beginning to wonder if quote #1 was going to go undefeated. Like you, I fully get the ‘full of idea’ concept, and struggle with execution. Tough when your mind is always roving around. Always wondered if the only options for professional writers were to see it as a mechanical formula or to simply go crazy.

  6. I choose option 2

    I completely understand what the writer is talking about. Knowing that something really cool is just waiting to be written on those pages is a feeling I can’t even describe. I think that’s why I keep my notebook where I write all my ideas down and am careful to make sure nothing happens to it. I am even careful with the notebook that I have for when I fill up the next one. To know that something that could change the world (or at least a small part of it) could be written in from me is cool to know. Those notebooks are just waiting to have something written that I don’t know that I am going to write. Just the potential is something to cherish and to enjoy. The ideas are just waiting to come pouring out, and all I have to do is write.

    ***

    Mr. Long: I have so much respect for people like you that manage to keep an active journal/notebook on their person daily. I’m a junkie for wanting to buy blank journals, but frankly I’m lousy at always keeping them active. Wish I had a small fraction of what you have on this front.

  7. [b]“It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop.” — Vita Sackville-West[/b]

    This quote can tell a lot about how someone who is a big writer feels day to day. Only a writer can possibly feel that it is necessary to write everyday. A writer feels they have to write so that their days are not boring or maybe so they don’t forget something great that happened on that day. Like the butterfly, if the writer does not capture the moment of what was/is happening on paper the moment will quickly get away from them. If it gets away even if they remember it, the details wouldn’t be as great as when the memory was fresh. The writers think that if they let one detail of one moment get away then they will forget it, and if they remember it it just won’t be the same so the mood is gone and then life at the moment that that amazing thing happened is gone. So a writer may have a advantage over someone who is not because their mind catches the littlest changes that could make or break a moment, add something to that memory or a important detail that a normal non writers mind would just glaze over as they saw/read it.

    ***

    Mr. Long: Enjoyed the butterfly line in particular. And I fully agree on the idea that the brain can catch the tiniest shaded of change (and why so many non-writers seem in awe of what can be done simply through 24/7 observation).

  8. I would have to say that the first quote was the one that really caught my eye. It presents writing as a way to capture a moment in time so that it can keep. It’s like when you freeze some pizza so that it can be reopened and eaten anew. It states that if you try to just memorize an event, you’ll find that you won’t be able to remember it. Instead, the wise man will write down the special little event so that, after years, he will be able to get out the book and be able to remember it. Writing is a way to perserve a tiny or even large peice of history and have it so that future generations will be able to enjoy it. In my opinion, this quote can be more quickly expressed like this; a book is timeless.

    ***

    Mr. Long: Confession — this is my first time making the connection between writing and thawing out frozen pizza. The preservation concept definitely makes sense!

  9. “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

    This quote intrigued me the most. It shows how an obvious description works, but a more subtle message can be more powerful. A moon that is shining has almost become a literary cliché. However, showing that a moon is shining by seeing its reflection opens up a whole new world of possibility. It is a moon-lit night, with all of the possible meaning that has, but the moon has been reflected. Maybe it shows on a piece of metal in a field or is reflected in the eyes of someone near you, whatever is reflecting the moon light instantly becomes important to the story.

    Also, this quote reminded me of how movies are made and produced. Directors often show you the time of day or weather subtly, they want you to know what it is, but without the obvious flash of the camera to the outside. Showing the glint of the broken glass does more to the story than showing the lit moon.

  10. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov.

    I find this quote interesting because of the hidden message inside or atleast what i believe to be the hidden message. This message speaks of the natural instinct of a writer to see a story take shape on a blank piece of paper. Knowing that something really inspiring is waiting to be introduced to the world is a feeling im sure only the best of writers are capable of feeling. This Quote also give me the inspiration to create something that will affect people. I realize that i am capable of creating something that could influence people all over the world i just have to have the imagination to start it.

  11. The second option stood out for me. This quote tells us all we have the mind and knowledge to write a very good paper. We all have the potential to write interesting, unique papers. If we did a bad job, we also have the skill and oppurtunity to make into a better one. This quote relates to me sometimes. I understand such novel we are reading and when it comes to writing sometimes, I don’t get what I want to have(as in words) have on the paper. We all have great ideas. All we have to do is write them.

  12. I agree with the second quote. I’m not an avid writer and usually I have to be forced to write. However, sometimes words just pour out of me and onto the paper. I know how it feels when something sparks your imagination and you have to write it down. However, when this happens it is very rare. I don’t enjoy writing. I’ve had to do it for so long, but there are those times when I do enjoy writting. This quote is every instance of that.

  13. I chose Option 3; I thought it was really poetic.

    To me, the moon shining seems to be the physical words, their definition, and the sentences they construct together. Everybody can see the moon, just as everyone can see the words. We can never touch the moon, however; it is always just out of our reach. Can one every truly understand the meaning behind words, or do we like to think because we are intelligent, we know the meaning to life? No one can touch the moon, but everyone can feel the moonlight on their glass. What is more special to a person is the light the words can ignite inside them. Through words, we can express ourselves in ways we could only dream of if words did not exist.

    The moonlight seems to fill in the cracks of the glass, and make it whole and beautiful once again. With words that we understand, based on our own experiences, we can become complete. We as humans need the splendor of words just as we need the beauty and mystique of the moon.

  14. #3

    This quote is one which demonstrates the idea that something needs to be seen to be believed. In other words do not just say something is true, demonstrate that it is true. However this quote does not completely embody this ideal because it is stated not that the speaker wants to see the moon shining directly but yet, “a glint of light on broken glass”. This suggests that an ideal can be indirectly demonstrated or proven. I think this applies to so many works of literature because in essence they are indirectly proving the ideals of the author. Though the works can not show the validity of the author’s ideal the literature tells a story relating to it. This relates back to a quote from last week where it was stated that “What I like in a good author is not what he says, but what he whispers. — Logan Pearsall Smith, “All Trivia”, Afterthoughts, 1931. These quotes are related in their belief that a point does not need to be directly stated or proven but discovered through the text by the reader. Reading a work of literature should be a journey and a mystery of sorts, where the reader has to find their own path to the author’s main purpose and point. If a piece is simply read with no thought or analysis by the reader then they will be incapable of seeing the glint of the moon through the glass. The truth in all literature is found only by those that search for that piece of broken glass or listen for that whisper. Without the will to find the proof in literature no conclusions will be made and an individual will leave a piece just how they found it, locked and full of undiscovered meaning.

  15. “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

    This was an incredible line; this quote is just incredibly interesting to me. I’m not really sure what it means, and I think that’s part of the reason I like it so much. I think, as a writer, he’s trying to give advice to other writer’s telling them not to state a fact in an obvious matter, but to tell the same fact in a more indirect and intricate way. He wants people to use words to accelerate the mind and make the reader think, as opposed to tell them blatant facts that aren’t really that interesting within themselves. But at the same time, it could be used as maybe a philosophy on life. Maybe it could mean, “Don’t focus on the obvious, try to see how it affects the world around you.” Or something. It can be whatever you want it to be, I just think its a neat quote.

  16. “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

    I like this quote because it presents an interesting idea. What I think this statement means is that instead of stating the obvious of a story, or anything for that matter, say something that was affected by it. Anton also wants the reader to make observations on the minute details, not just focusing on the overall picture. Being able to do that allows us to really appreciate and understand the works that writers like Anton create.

  17. Student #16 (revision)

    “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

    I like this quote because it presents an interesting idea. What I think this statement means is that instead of stating the obvious of a story, or anything for that matter, say something that was affected by it. Anton also wants the reader to make observations on the minute details, not just focusing on the overall picture. Being able to do that allows us to really appreciate and understand the works that writers like Anton create.

    Most people in our society only look at things that are right in front of them. They never take into consideration, the parts that make up what their observing nor the other things that are around it. People like them need to understand that you can’t always think about the path that’s straight ahead. Sometimes you should look to where that path branches off or where the path is going to lead.

  18. This quote inspires all writers or students of writing. It encourages us to believe in ourselves that we have a message, a worthy idea, or a story in our minds before we start writing. It is telling us that since we already have something worthwhile to say, all we have to do is relax and let it flow out. Nabokov’s message is that when a writer suffers from a writer’s block, he needs to just open his mind and let the imagination flow. Then, the blank pages will reveal the words of a great story previously trapped in the writers’ minds. Instead of forcing out the story, Nabokov wants students such as us to just open our minds and let the story come to us. He believes that the story comes naturally for any person who wants to have a story and share that with others. When the writer comes up with the story, it is as if the writer doesn’t have to do much work, just the actual writing. Nabokov believes the story was in the blank pages all along, and that all the writer just has to do is to reveal it. (I’ve read somewhere that Michelangelo, the famous sculptor, said a similar thing—that in the marble, there is a horse or a saint trapped and waiting to come out.)

    ***

    Mr. Long: Great nod to Michelangelo. It was an ‘angel’, however, but the sentiment holds true. Essentially, he meant that the sculptor’s job was merely to chip away at enough of the stone until the angel was ‘set free’. It’s a lovely perspective for any writer/artist, IMHO.

  19. “It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop.” — Vita Sackville-West

    A writer’s mind is in constant motion, steadily eliciting moments that are worthy of being captured and translated into the written word. The writer’s gift for recording these snapshots in time can be easily be lost if the writer lets these undocumented moments pass. Similar to the Energizer Bunny, a gifted writer’s mind just keeps going and going and going. A writer finds ideas everywhere and from everything. Sackville-West is saying that a writer must employ the idea of Carpe Diem. When a writer fails to capture the moment, the writer’s poetic energy may dissipate into oblivion. Just like death, the writer’s “moment” is incapable of being resurrected. This is what I think is meant be “life itself is gone”. Quick thinking and the ability to recognize the inspirational flash in time is what sets a gifted writer apart from an average writer.

  20. Option 2 was defiantly my pick because the quotation wasn’t just referring to a piece of paper that was blank but a sheet that symbolizes, in my eyes, how people are when they want something to be heard or they want to be noticed they are just afraid to make it visible. I know that sometimes i sit through and have blank pieces of paper in my life and when the ink finally shows its almost as if the weight of the world gets lighter. Its hard sometimes to show how you are feeling or what you are thinking because your afraid of what outcome could be. I think that everyone has a piece of paper with invisible ink on it and at different points in everyones life i think they ink will bleed through and stand out. I like how Vladimir Nabakov made something with simple words into something with a large and amazing meaning behind, it is incredible.

  21. I completely agree with the second quote. Wow it is so true. I think it means that even though a person has yet to start writing a book, the ideas running through his head are wonderful. Every person has an idea and that light bulb always goes off. For me, when I am about to write something, I think long and hard about what to write about. As soon as I figure something out, I get really excited (on nerd mode) and start writing. The moment that light bulb goes off in my head, I feel like the smartest person ever and write all my ideas down. The quote is saying how although people may not have started to write their story, the moment an idea comes to mind, the page is full of potential words, in the mind of the author.

  22. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov

    The quote orginally caught my eye because it reminded me of how I write. I know what I want to write and I have a strong idea but I can’t figure out how I want to express it. I’m sure everyone feels that way sometimes, they know they want to write or do something big, they just cannot figure out the right way to do it. I thought the quote had a really strong message as well. Even when you think you don’t know what to write or you think you don’t know how to do something it is always inside of you ready to come out. All a person has to do is believe in themselves and they can see the invisible ink and make it visible. The pages are blank and when they are filled with ink they will be diffrent for each person. What someone writes depends on their feelings and expierience. For every person it is diffrent, but it always starts out the same, a blank page.

  23. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov

    I love writing. When I write, I stare at the page (or empty white space on the computer) and feel like it’s all there, just waiting to flower. The page is not blank. It only seems like it. The information is there, the inspiration is there, the beauty is there, simply invisible to everyone except me. No one can see it, but it wants to burst because it’s been hidden so long. I think this quote is spot-on. The words will come. You just need to wait.

  24. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, writtten in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.”

    I believe this quote means that a page holds so many opportunities for something to be formed. The paper is the basis of so many stories, poems, pictures etc., the only thing someone has to do is right down their thoughts. I also believe that someone is always coming up with new ideas and interesting facts. It seems like as soon as you sit to write it down everything you thought goes away and you begin to see it from a different perspective. As soon as you write something down though it begins to scream for more. It continues to flow even after your initial thought it already written down. So it evolves into something very grand.

  25. “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

    This one intrigued me because it is almost gothic in the second description. I love the thought that one image can be conveyed in a thousand different ways. The viewpoint of a story is always more interesting from an outsider, reflecting the story back with their own special hues and shades over it. A reader is more likely to be snagged by a description hinting towards a great story than a plain statement. When you read this you want to know why the glass is broken, where it came from, and what the glint of moonlight is shining on. It alludes to something being visible during the moonlit hours of the night that isn’t quite so interesting during the day. Following this glint of light is taking the road less traveled, leading you down a path that wasn’t right in front of you, but is exponentially more exciting.

  26. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov

    There is something really powerful about this quote. I think Nabakov’s message is saying that words and ideas are already present — someone just has to find them first. As a writer, sometimes I start a project or visual vocab story with reluctance, only to end up completely absorbed within them. I usually don’t make outlines or ponder much over what I’m going to write. I just start writing, and the words and plot form on the spot. I think Nabakov, besides stating that ideas are things that are waiting to be found, also is implying that a writer can find ideas by simply writing. Given thought is not necessarily required to create a story. The wonderful thing about writing is that stories can unfold unexpectedly when you haven’t planned on it — in my LOTF alternate ending I had originally planned for Ralph to kill Jack and become a total savage. However, as I was writing, the story somehow unfolded into something else. It was Roger who killed Jack and Ralph ended up retaining his civil qualities — I’m sure if I had written the story at another time, a different plotline would have emerged. I didn’t have to give any thought to the unfolding and change of the plot. My fingers typed it and just went along with the story as if the idea had already been written in invisible ink. As Nabakov points out, ideas are already on paper, but they are hidden. As you write, these ideas become clear and “clamor” into visibility — and they can transform into a totally different idea within your subconsciousness.

  27. “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

    I like this quote because it’s like saying don’t state the obvious, show it to me in a different way. Or at least something along those lines. It’s trying to explain how to look at things differently. Kind of looking at glass being half full or half empty. It’s always good to look at things differently, to be that unique person to find the secret no one else can. Overall I like this quote because telling someone to look at a moon light through glass kind of opens a new portal to something completely different, the moon would be like skewed through the glass, putting perspective in a warped view, almost like a Picasso painting.

  28. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” –Vladimir Nabakov

    This quote stood out the most to me. I fully comprehend what the author is trying say. I feel the same way sometimes when I try to write. I have some great ideas but I may not always be able to get them out on paper. I love the feeling of when I can finally express what I’m thinking on paper, and the pages begin to fill. This quote motivates writers when it comes to their ideas and how to express them. Even some of the best writers have trouble conveying their ideas occasionally. This quote tells us that we are all capable of writing a great story, and that sometimes we should just relax and let the words flow. This quote is very inspiring to me and probably a great number of writers.

  29. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov

    Whenever there is inspiration an author does not need to think or to visualize, the writing is just there. The words are already there, and there is the overwhelming desire to write them. I think Nabakov is exactly the same as me. I feel the words before I write them. I hear what I want to say. The sensation is incredible. The openness of the page invitess a gushing of language. The writer feels as though he can write forever. It is the antithesis of writers block and it is the experience of enlightenment that every writer dreams of.

  30. Option 2:“The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” – Vladimir Nabakov

    When I write I have a load of amazing ideas that are in my head, but they only seem to make sense when I put them on paper. No matter how many different topics are in my head, when I write them down everything falls into place. Unfortunately this only applies to creative writing and not essay writing, at least for me. When the writing isn’t there, only concepts exist, when my ideas are visible, I’m usually happy with the result. The plot just seems to unfold as I write, so much so that it seems that the writing should already be there. Nabakov seems to know exactly how I feel about writing. Not much thinking is really involved in writing until you start getting concerned about format or quality (the quality part sounds terrible but it’s very true).

  31. The first quote caught my eye. It is true because days might slip by and we won’t notice anything. It is important to write something about each day to preserve the experience you had that day. Otherwise each day will go by without you even noticing or remembering anything at all. It captures the moment you had that day. You can look back on it and it will never go away. This is something like a book, it will last forever.

  32. “Dont’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”
    -Anton Chekhov

    This quote caught my eye the most because of the enticing language used here. I like how it symbolizes someone having a conversation in a way and the person giving them advice. To me it means that some things are there but just need to be magnified. Like a talent or something that one may posess that has not been magnified. The broken glass symbolizes someone you may not ecpect to have a “glint of light” sort of like a broken soul. I like this quote because i think that it has the potential of inspiring someone out there to notice their strengths no matter what others may say and just shine!!

  33. I think quote #2 definetly caught my eye. The way Nabakov describes the words as ” clomoring” is very interesting. When you write it doesnet all just come to you at once you have to plot your course. The road to a good paragraph is a long and winding path, at least for me. When Im thinking of all kinds of Ideas for my next sentence, I tend to lose track of my next Idea. Its very true how the ink is invisible on the page before you write it. when your staring down an empty page something inside you tells you Im going to write something good. The quote brings out this sense of being a good writer, thats why I like it.

  34. Quote from Anton Chekhov

    #3 – “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”

    I chose this one because I though this one sounded the most poetic. I think some writers sometimes try to over explain things by simply stating them and using flat descriptions of the obvious. This is fine, but it would capture more of the reader’s attention if you give them the details. Some of the details would be like using metaphors, similes, and imagery to paint a picture that engages the reader’s imagination and that create a powerful, emotional response. With that said, I think that it is similar to the quote “The role of a writer is not to say what we all can say, but what we are unable to say.” — Anais Nin. However since it also says a “glint of light on broken glass”, I also think that the quote is saying for writers to tell something indirectly. Therefore, I also agree with the second student #4 (I think it is suppose to be 14) with the part about it being related to the quote “What I like in a good author is not what he says, but what he whispers.” — Logan Pearsall Smith, “All Trivia”, Afterthoughts, 1931.

  35. It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop.” — Vita Sackville-West

    This quote really stood out to me. There are moments in my life I wish I had recorded somewhere. I remember them but I don’t really remember how exactly I felt. However, if the moment is really important to you, you’ll remember it without aid.

    Writers look at moments with a creative eye. They see things differently than those involved in the moment, they have the eye of the outsider. When someone tells you something from your past, it is a different story because you see the story differently from your point of view.

  36. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov.

    Like writting this blog entry, the ‘page is blank’ and words are just waiting to be written on here. I agree with student #5, I have alot of ideas that I want to write I just can’t get my mind to focus on just one. But when I actually get to focus on one, there are so many different ways of writing it. That by the time I think of a way my mind wants to write about something else. A blank page is very intimidating to people like student #5 and I. At least to me it is, when I look at it and I can’t think of anything to write it criticizes me and tells me to write something now. Then sooner or later something is written that could be the best ever.

  37. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov

    Just like drawing or painting, this shows writing is another form of creativity. Earlier this year I talked about how as an artist I view a blank page differently than others. I see possibilities and imagine what could be on the page. It seems like Nabakov knows what I’m talking about. He, as a writer can see the words and feels them dying to be shown, just like an artist who can see the picture gleaming through the blank page. It is such a talent to be able to see so much on a blank sheet. Ordinary people can’t, and that’s what seperates artists whether it be a writer or drawer from the normal. We all see things differently, and it shows through our writing. Each person will look at one object completley different from another, so when we are given prompts we all see something different.

  38. I like the third quotation. It’s interesting because it is talking about belief. When it says “Don’t tell me the moon is shinning” it means that you can’t believe what you hear. When it says “show me the glint of light on broken glass” it’s saying to give proof of what is being told. I think this was most likely said by someone who doesn’t have much faith in anything or anyone. Anton Chekhov could also just be someone who was very cautious and needed proof to feel comfortable. The second idea sounds more likely because it sounds more like a common human action.

  39. I chose to write about the second quote because that one really stuck out compared to the other ones. That quote is very true. There are so many blank pages in this world that tell a story even though there arent words written down yet. You can learn things and understand things even without the words. When writting things the author has many ideas in his/her head they just havent written down yet. They are overflowing with questions and ideas but they want to be sure to pick the right one that will keep people guessing or just shock people out of their minds. They want to make sure they are saying the right things.

  40. “The pages are still blank, but there is a miraculous feeling of the words being there, written in invisible ink and clamoring to become visible.” — Vladimir Nabakov

    This quote was interesting me because as soon as I read it I produced the clear question; How are the words there when the page is blank? It seems that the answer is how great writers can feel the words of a great piece as they plan it out and understand how it will ‘sound’ on paper before it is written. The writer is aching to get the words out and it feels great when they are transferred to paper. I think it could also mean that all great thoughts and stories are there, it just needs to be written. When you have a blank page you have a variety of paths leading to other paths to choose in the piece. Once you start writing, the words keep flowing out and it becomes hard to stop as these many paths create a chain for your story. The more that is written the more complex the story becomes and the more opportunities there are to choose from later on on the ‘blank’ pages.

  41. “It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop.” — Vita Sackville-West

    Writing is very important to keep events from the past from disappearing forever. History is saved because it is written down. How else will people remember things that happened thousands of years ago? When something happens, writing it down will allow it to be remembered forever. It is similar to a photograph. That once in a life-time coincidence will never happen again, but writing it down will help explain exactly what happened, allowing it to happen again each time it is read. Writing things down is also the fastest way to save ideas and thoughts of the moment. Without writing it down, it will be forgotten and all memories of it will be erased. This is why writing is important. Is saves and retells everything that has happened, and prevents important events from being completely forgotten.

  42. “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” — Anton Chekhov

    This quote caught my eye immediately after I got on this page. It was the only quote that said no. It went outside the box, and instead of saying “show me the glint…” it said “Don’t.” I’m so tired of happy, imaginary world, quotes. I like to see diversity, and this quote has diversity, even though it’s only one sentence. Which is another thing, quotes today are very long, and lose my attention quickly. I like quotes to be short, sweet, and to the point, like this one.

  43. This quote intrigues me the most. I think this quote means that when an author is writing a story forms as the author writes. The author, as he/she writes, can formulate ideas as he/she writes. I think that all good authors can do this. Not the average author can do this. Good authors get a feeling or a sense of what to write next. They start out writing without a certain topic, but they end up writing something really great

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